Police in Zambia arrested two Chinese nationals over the weekend over allegations that they were giving illegal military training to members of a local security firm.

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The US and Canada have reached a new trade deal, along with Mexico, to replace the current North American Free Trade Agreement (Nafta).

The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) is said to involve more US access to Canada's dairy market and a cap on its car exports to the US.

However, the joint US-Canada statement did not give details of the agreement.

US President Donald Trump has long sought to change Nafta, which governed more than $1tn (£767bn) in trade.

Until recently it looked as if Canada could be excluded from a final agreement.

"Today, Canada and the United States reached an agreement, alongside Mexico, on a new, modernized trade agreement for the 21st Century: the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement," US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said in a joint statement.

The agreement "will give our workers, farmers, ranchers and businesses a high-standard trade agreement that will result in freer markets, fairer trade and robust economic growth in our region".

It comes as the US has fought a trade war on several fronts this year, including placing tariffs on steel and aluminium imports from Mexico and Canada.

What is in the new deal?

While the exact details of the agreement have not been released, the new accord is expected to contain key provisions on Canada's dairy industry and car exports to the US.

US farmers will have access to about 3.5% of Canada's dairy market, Reuters reported, citing sources.

Canada is also reported to have secured some protections for its automobile industry against potential US tariffs.

US tariffs on steel and aluminium will remain for now, the sources said.

How was the deal reached?

The US made a deal with Mexico in August, but relations with Canada over the trade pact had become increasingly strained in recent weeks.

The Trump administration set Sunday as a deadline for Canada to strike a deal.

A protectionist policy under the Mr Trump has seen the US forge ahead with individual trade deals, rejecting bigger multi-lateral trade agreements and posing a challenge to decades of global free trade.

As part of this policy Mr Trump has also launched a trade war against China, which has already hurt companies and could curb global economic growth.

US-China trade row: What has happened so far?

Deal brings 'relief'

This deal has been 13 months in the making - and there were times when it seemed like the finish line might never be reached.

More than once US President Donald Trump threatened to tear up Nafta, or leave Canada out in the cold after coming to a bilateral agreement with Mexico in August.

The relationship between the American and Canadian leaders seemed to grow rocky as the talks dragged on.

So having an agreement will come as a relief to the many industries in both the US and Canada that depend on Nafta and that have been living with uncertainty since the talks began.

Still, while Mr Trudeau has maintained he would not agree to a deal that was not in Canada's best interests, they will be waiting to get a clear picture of what concessions were made in the final hours to secure the agreement.

Source : BBC

Police in the Netherlands have arrested seven men over an alleged plot to carry out what they describe as a major terrorist attack involving guns and explosives.

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In a bid to boost tourism to the country, South Africa is finalising a number of visa waiver agreements with other countries, allowing travellers to enter the country without a visa.

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Italy is to allow migrant rescue ships to dock until the EU reaches a deal to distribute new arrivals. Foreign Minister Enzo Moavero Milanesi said Italy would continue to accept vessels for five weeks while the EU renegotiated its existing policy.

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Gunmen in South Africa have killed 11 taxi drivers in an ambush, police say. The men from Gauteng province were travelling to Johannesburg on Saturday night when their minibus was fired at.

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The son of South Africa’s ex-President Jacob Zuma will appear in two separate court cases this week after returning to the country to attend his brother’s funeral, adding to the controversy around the former ruling family’s activities.

Duduzane Zuma, 34, has been asked to appear in the Specialised Commercial Crimes Court in Johannesburg on Monday, his lawyer Rudi Krause said by phone on Sunday.

The Sunday Times newspaper reported that a special police unit known as the Hawks was preparing corruption charges against the former president’s son for his role in the attempted bribing of the country’s former Deputy Finance Minister Mcebisi Jonas.

“At this point in time we do not know what the case relates to," Krause said. Neither Duduzane Zuma nor his lawyer has further responded to the accusations yet.

Duduzane Zuma is a business partner of the Gupta family, headed by three brothers, who left South Africa earlier this year after being accused of using their political connections to influence government decisions and loot state coffers. Jacob Zuma and the Guptas have denied any wrongdoing.

The former president’s son has also been summoned to appear in court on July 12, for culpable homicide, according to his attorneys. The case relates to a car accident in 2014 in which Zuma’s Porsche collided with a minibus taxi, resulting in the death of a passenger.

 

Source: Bloomberg

A new video has been released of the 12 boys and their football coach trapped in a Thai cave, in which they say they are in good health. Smiling and at times laughing, they each introduce themselves one by one.

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The forces behind Saturday’s grenade attack at a rally in Ethiopia attended by Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed could strike again, the government said on Wednesday, urging the public to remain vigilant at public gatherings.

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Tanzanian prosecutors on Wednesday charged two chief executives of mobile phone companies and four other suspects with fraud as part of a crackdown against tax evasion in the East African nation.

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US Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy is to retire, giving President Donald Trump the chance to cement a conservative majority on the top court. The conservative has sided with liberals on many decisions, including the 5-4 rulings that decided same-sex marriage and upheld abortion rights.

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